Lest we forget

Defending the English Channel

I was going to write something about Britain in 1940. I stroked my chin. I pondered. I massaged my little grey cells. And then I decided to leave it to someone who was there, living through it. Not only was he there, but he wrote the official history too. Anyway, here’s what he thought:

The dangers we face are still enormous, but so are our advantages and resources. I recount them because the people have a right to know that there are solid grounds for the confidence which we feel, and that we have good reason to believe ourselves capable, as I said in a very dark hour two months ago, of continuing the war “if necessary alone, if necessary for years.”…

The great air battle which has been in progress over this Island

Air Observer watching the skies of London

for the last few weeks has recently attained a high intensity. It is too soon to attempt to assign limits either to its scale or to its duration. We must certainly expect that greater efforts will be made by the enemy than any he has so far put forth.… It is quite plain that Herr Hitler could not admit defeat in his air attack on Great Britain without sustaining most serious injury. If after all his boastings and bloodcurdling threats and lurid accounts trumpeted round the world of the damage he has inflicted, of the vast numbers of our Air Force he has shot down, so he says, with so little loss to himself …if after all this his whole air onslaught were forced after a while tamely to peter out, the Fuhrer’s reputation for veracity of statement might be seriously impugned. We may be sure, therefore, that he will continue as long as he has the strength to do so…

…It must also be remembered that all the enemy machines and pilots which are shot down over our Island, or over the seas which surround it, are either destroyed or captured; whereas a considerable proportion of our machines, and also of our pilots, are saved, and soon again in many cases come into action.… We believe that we shall be able to continue the air struggle indefinitely and as long as the enemy pleases, and the longer it continues the more rapid will be our approach, first towards that parity, and then into that superiority, in the air upon which in a large measure the decision of the war depends.

The gratitude of every home in our Island, in our Empire, and indeed throughout the world, except in the abodes of the guilty, goes out to the British airmen who, undaunted by odds, unwearied in their constant challenge and mortal danger, are turning the tide of the World War by their prowess and by their devotion. Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

David Cameron, however, was so eager to kiss the hairy arse of make a good impression with the USA, that he said

I think it is important in life to speak as it is and the fact is that we are a very effective partner of the US but we are the junior partner,” he said.

We were the junior partner in 1940 when we were fighting the Nazis.

The Few

So eager was he to point out that Britain is a smaller country with fewer people and less power, that he called Britain over-and-over the ‘junior’ partner. Especially, apparently in 1940 when we as a nation were fighting a daily battle with the Luftwaffe and the USA were mainly listening in on their radios. Way to go Dave. It’s great to know our Prime Minister has a sense of his country’s history.

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